Tuesday, 23 August 2016

Timbarra Housing Estate, Berwick

The Timbarra Housing Estate was established in November 1989. It was an Urban Land Authority development. The brochure (cover reproduced left) said that the chief objective , in planning this large residential sub-division, is to provide a mix of housing styles and prices on lots of varying size. In this way we will be able to make housing more affordable to more people who have  a variety of lifestyle requirements....It is clear that the traditional three bedroom house on a quarter acre block of land is no longer relevant to a significant proportion of households, many of which are just one or two people....A great deal of planning has gone into ensuring that Timbarra offers all the facilities a growing community will need. A complete range of community facilities, meeting places, walkways, parks and school sites will be provided...

One of these facilities, the Timbarra Community Centre opened July 10, 1993.

Timbarra covered an area of 200 hectares of gently undulating pasture, scattered with shelter belts of trees was the brochure's bucolic description of the land.  An estimated 300 homes will be under construction early in 1990 and by 1994 it was estimated that there would be around 3,000 houses.


Location of Timbarra from the 1989 sales brochure.

We have a brochure (see below) from the Urban Land Authority advertising a ballot to buy land in the Timbarra Estate - The Gateway. The ballot took place May 9, 1992. The brochure includes a number of street plans (or Housing Siting Policy Plans) for Gumnut Court, Magdalene Place, Sunnyside Drive,Coowarra Way, Emma Court, Leonard Avenue, Adelaide Court, Oscar Court, Theodore Terrace and some of The Gateway, so if you live in any of these streets then it is likely that your block of land was purchased on May 9, 1992. You can see one of these plans, below.


The Gateway Ballot May 9, 1992 brochure. Timbarra Housing Estate  was originally in Narre Warren, until a boundary change 'moved' it into Berwick, see more about this, below.
The Gateway Lot Plan from the May 9, 1992 brochure


The is the House Siting Policy Plan for Sunnyside Drive and Magdalena Place from the May 9, 1992 brochure

The land was originally farm land owned partially by the Sweeney Family. The Sweeney Brothers, John and Daniel, arrived in Narre Warren around 1854. They had extensive land holdings in Narre Warren on both sides of the Princes Highway including where the Timbarra Estate is now. Daniel remained a bachelor and John married Alice Reedy and they had ten children.  The Sweeney’s have played a major role in the development of Narre Warren. Descendants of John and Alice donated land for the old Narre Warren Oval and for Our Ladies Help of Christians Catholic Church and Don Bosco School. Pat Sweeney sold the land where Timbarra is partially located  to the Housing Commission of Victoria in 1971, but it was later developed by the Urban Land Authority as a private estate not a housing commission estate.

Timbarra is an Aboriginal word meaning Grass Tree, the botanical name of which is Xanthorrhoea Australia. 

As you can see on the 1992 brochure, the Timbarra Estate was originally part of Narre Warren but  is now part of Berwick. The Melway Street Directory Edition 21, 1991 to 1992 has the Timbarra Estate in Narre Warren, with the boundary of Berwick and Narre Warren being Hessel Road. The Melway Street Directory Edition 23, 1995 has Timbarra Estate in Berwick, as the boundary has changed to Narre Warren North Road.  An article in the Berwick City News of January 13, 1994 says that the Office of Place Names has officially assigned boundaries to 10 suburbs in the City of Berwick and the Narre Warrren/Berwick boundary is listed as Hessel Road.

So we can establish that in December 1993 the boundary of Berwick/Narre Warren was Hessel Road and that sometime in 1995 it had changed to Narre Warren North Road.  Thus the Timbarra Estate had ‘moved’ from being in Narre Warren to being in Berwick sometime in 1994 or 1995 but I cannot be more specific than that.

Sunday, 31 July 2016

Mobile Library at Cockatoo by Marcia Holdsworth

A few years ago, Marcia wrote a short history of  Library Services at Cockatoo, and so they don't get lost from our history I thought we would share them in this blog.

Before 1983, the Dandenong Valley Regional Library Service (DVRLS) Mobile library, a Bedford Bus, used to visit Cockatoo once a fortnight for a few hours. It parked in the car park at the top of McBride Street, above the shops.  The staff used a Telxon device to record loans and the data was then downloaded via the telephone back at the Pakenham library.



The Bedford Bus Mobile Library

After the Ash Wednesday fires in 1983 DVRLS set up a joint-use Community Library in an area of the Cockatoo Primary School library. It opened around May of that year and Marcia Holdsworth was appointed Officer in Charge in the October. The Library initially opened to the general public Wednesday afternoon and Saturday morning. The cost effectiveness of the Community Library was re-assessed in 1992 and after negotiations with the School it was decided to phase out the service and re-introduce a Mobile Library Service.

Thus in January 1993 the Mobile timetable was expanded to include a stop at Cockatoo. The mobile had been recently upgraded to a brand new semi-trailer mobile provided by the then Pakenham Shire. It now parked at the Cockatoo Kindergarten/Bowling green car park in McBride Street. The new vehicle visited every Thursday afternoon until 7.30pm and with the extended hours the circulation increased. The Mobile Library still visits Cockatoo every Thursday from 1.30pm until 7.30pm.


This is the only photo we have of the Cockatoo Library, sadly, it's fairly ordinary quality. It was taken by the Shire of Pakenham in the 1980s.

Thursday, 21 July 2016

The local Catholic Community from the pages of The Advocate

The Advocate is available on Trove from 1868 until 1954. The Catholic Archdiocese of Melbourne website provides this great summary of this paper Melbourne’s Advocate was one of Australia’s great Catholic newspapers. It was first published on 1 February 1868 by Samuel Vincent Winter and his brother Joseph to report on events in Australia and overseas from the viewpoint of the Catholic paradigm. Its goal was to “fairly and intelligently represent the Catholic and Irish section of the community, and, while defending their legitimate interests, would aim at promoting the prosperity of the colony, and cultivating a friendly feeling among all classes of the community”. In 1902, The Advocate imported a font of Irish type and became the first newspaper in Australia to be able to print the Gaelic language. In 1919, The Advocate was bought by the Archdiocese of Melbourne and became its official newspaper. The Advocate remained a weekly newspaper up until it ceased publication in 1990. 

 In this post we will take a look at the sorts of local historical information we can find in The Advocate, concentrating on reports of the opening of Catholic Churches in the Casey Cardinia region, but before we do here is a short overview of the Parish structure in the area. As early as the 1840s Priests from Melbourne used to visit the area - Pakenham, Nar Nar Goon and the Western Port region. In 1853  the Brighton Misson was established, a very large area that covered the south east part of Melbourne, the Mornington Peninsula, Bass Coast and West Gippsland. In April 1883 the Dandenong Parish or Mission  was established which covered nearly all of the Casey Cardinia region, plus Dandenong, Phillip Island, down to Wonthaggi and the Mornington Peninsula. This Parish was eventually split up with the Iona Parish being created in 1905, Koo-Wee-Rup in 1946, St Mary's North Tynong (or Maryknoll) in 1950 (combined with Iona in 1968), Pakenham in 1954, Berwick (including Cranbourne) in 1956, Doveton in 1962, Cranbourne in 1973, Endeavour Hills in 1980 and Narre Warren in 1982. This information and some of the information in the rest of this post comes from A Parish carved from the bush: the centenary history of the Dandenong Parish, 1883-1983.

Back to The Advocate -  the first Catholic Church in the area was St Agatha's at Cranbourne which was opened on February 6, 1861, so a bit too early to be reported in The Advocate. However, the  second St Agatha's which was opened on January 20, 1929 had a full page report, which you can read here. This church was opened by Archbishop Mannix and the total cost including fit-out was just over 3,100 pounds. The current St Agatha's was built in 1981. This Church was partially funded by a generous bequeath of $492,000 from Mr Eddie Donnelly who passed away in 1979. You can read more of the history on their website   http://www.stagathas.org.au/



The opening of St Agatha's Church at Cranbourne in 1929 with the original weatherboard Church next to it.

The next church to open was St Patrick's in Pakenham which opened in 1871. The existing Church was built in 1976. The original Church is still standing and is now part of the St Patrick's School.


A report on the building of St Patricks in The Advocate July 29, 1871.



An early photo of St Patricks at Pakenham.
Source: North of the Line:  a pictorial record published by the Berwick Pakenham Historical society

The first Berwick Catholic Church was officially opened by Archbishop Goold on March 31, 1878. It was originally known as St Joseph's, but later changed to  St Michael's. The Advocate described the Church as a handsome and commodius edifice. You can read the full report here. The second Church at Berwick was opened on January 24 1937 by Archbishop Mannix.  The Advocate had  full report, including photographs, which you can read here.  The old wooden church was removed having been sold to Dan Cunningham of Nar Nar Goon, but burnt down before he could use it. The current St Michael's Church was opened in 1984.

Archbishop Mannix at the opening of St Michael's in Berwick in 1937.
The Advocate January 28, 1937.

St Joseph's at Iona was the next Church to be opened, which took place on December 16, 1900. Iona was  known as Bunyip South until 1905. The current St Joseph's Church was opened on April 14 1940. You can read The Advocate report about this  here.



The opening of St Joseph's Iona in December 1900.
The Advocate December 22, 1900



Iona Church and Presbytery, c. 1909
Photo: 100 years of a faith community: St Joseph’s Iona 1905-2005 by Damian Smith (St Joseph’s Catholic Church, 2005)


The first decade of the twentieth century continued to be  a busy time for the Dandenong Mission with three other Churches  established. Two years after Iona, another Church was opened on the Koo-Wee-Rup Swamp, this time at Koo-Wee-Rup. St John the Baptist Church  was opened on August 24, 1902. You can read about this here. The current Church, built in Modernist Design, was opened in 1962. The Nar Nar Goon Catholic Church opened on May 29, 1904 on land donated by James Kelly.  There is a short account in The Advocate here. The current St James was opened on March 13, 1971. On September 14, 1908 the Lang Lang Church was opened, it is called St Marys. The Advocate report can be found here



St John the Baptist Church at Koo-Wee-Rup, 1950s.
Koo-Wee-Rup Swamp Historical Society photograph.


The  Tooradin Catholic Church  opened on December 3, 1922 and, as befits a fishing village, it was named St Peters, after the Patron Saint of Fishermen. The report is here. The Church was closed and the building was moved to St Peter's College in Cranbourne in 2003 where it is used as a Chapel.  A few weeks later, on December 31, 1922 Scared Heart Catholic Church at Gembrook opened. Here is the report. The Church was scheduled to be officially opened in July 1922, but the Archbishop couldn't make it due to the bad state of the roads after a lot of rain,  it was rescheduled for October and had to be postponed again for the same reason. Gembrook was in the Fern Tree Gully Parish. 

On September 3, 1950 St Mary's Rural Settlement was opened by Archbishop Mannix at North Tynong. Now called Maryknoll, you can read about the history of the settlement here.  The Holy Family Church was opened in 1963, so we can't read a report on Trove as The Advocate is only digitised until 1954, about it, but this is the link to the report of the opening of the Community from The Advocate of September 6, 1950.

The Advocate September 6 1950


There are other Catholic Churches in Casey Cardinia which were opened after 1954 - The Holy Family Church at Doveton was opened in 1960. In either late 1961 or early 1962 St Kevin's at Hampton Park was opened - this was in a building that had been transported to the site - the old St Leonard's Church from Glen Waverley. You can see  a photo of it on a blog post I have written on the history of Hampton Park here. They appear to have  a newer building now, but I don't have any details on it. Our Lady Help of Christians Catholic Church was opened in February 1980 at Narre Warren and the St Paul Apostle Catholic Church at Endeavour Hills was opened on August 14, 1983.

If you come from a Catholic Family there is a whole range of local and family information in The Advocate which may be of interest including  obituaries, school activities, debutante balls, advertisements from Catholic businesses, sports results, charity reports, crime reports.


Wednesday, 6 July 2016

Shire of Berwick - Report to Ratepayers - 1968/1969

This is a copy of the 'Report to Ratepayers' produced by the Shire of Berwick for 1968/1969. The Shire had an estimated population of 30,000 and covered the area from Doveton all the way down the Railway line to Bunyip and the towns north of the Highway - Narre Warren North, Harkaway, Beaconsfield Upper, Cockatoo and Gembrook and south of the Highway - Cora Lynn and Iona. There were 14,450 voters on the roll and 15,500 rateable properties. The Shire of Berwick was split onto the City of Berwick and the Shire of Pakenham in October 1973 - you can read about the chronological development of Local Government in our area here.


This shows the old Berwick Post Office in Gloucester Avenue. The Centenary Celebrations would have commemorated 100 years since the proclamation of the Shire of Berwick in 1868. The Shire Office was located in Pakenham on the corner of Main Street and John Street.


List of Councillors.


Shire statistics and a some instructions on payments of Rates. Rates, of course, was considered one of the key tenets or '3 Rs' of Local Government - the other two being Roads and Rubbish. The photo is of Edrington at Berwick - the home of the then Governor General of Australia - Lord Casey.


List of mainly Road works carried out in 1968 - the major works were carried out in the Doveton Ward, this being the most populated and also the Riding or Ward that brought in the most Rates.


On the left is the continuation of the Plans for 1969 and the right page lists some of the services provided by the Council. 2080 tons of rubbish was collected the previous year, which was burnt at Beaconsfield.


List of Rubbish tips - back when they were called 'Rubbish tips' not 'Waste management centres'. On the right page is  a list of all the Infant Welfare Centres in the Shire.


A list of other Council services and the photo is of the new Gembrook Pre-School Centre.


 A few 'Points to Observe' - the photo is of the Doveton Swimming Centre.


Wednesday, 29 June 2016

Tulliallan property at Cranbourne

This is a history of the Tulliallan property, which is situated in Clyde Road in Cranbourne, although most of the newspaper articles I have found on the property say it is at Berwick and now the area is technically called Cranbourne North. It is  a property that has had many prominent or socially connected owners and a few name changes. The Tulliallan property is Lots 28,29 and 45 in the Parish of Cranbourne - south of Glasscocks Road (or Pound Road as that section of road was previously known)  and  a portion is either side of Clyde Road.


Here's a bit of a mud map of Tulliallan - the property was Lots 28,29 and 45 in the Parish of Cranbourne. Click on the map to enlarge it.

Tulliallan was part of the Garem Gam Run of 3,200 acres (1300 hectares) taken up by James Bathe and T.J Perry in 1837, although some sources say it was 1840 before they actually settled on the run.  In 1845 it was subdivided and the eastern part was called Ravenhurst  and the other section was Mayune. However by 1850 or 1851 it appears that the property was leased as a whole again by Benjamin Rossiter, Maurice Feehan and Sarah O’Shea. By 1854  Benjamin Rossiter owned Lot 28 (316 acres) and his sons Charles and Thomas own Lot 45 (80 acres) amongst other land. Joseph Henderson owed Lot 29, 316 acres.


This is from The Good Country: Cranbourne Shire by Niel Gunson (Cranbourne Shire, 1968) and you can see the location of Benjamin Rossiter's Station

Benjamin Rossiter (1786 - 1858) and his wife Zillah Baynton (1789 - 1871)  had arrived in the Western Port area in 1842, having come out from Somersetshire in 1841. Benjamin Rossiter called his property Ravenhurst and this is where he died in 1858. His sons, Charles and Thomas, also used the Ravenhurst name for their property and they became the owners of  Lot 28 after their father died.


The Argus January 30, 1858

Gunson  says that Charles (1820 to 1895)  lived at Ravenhurst  until 1873 when he moved to Hawksdale at Yallock. However, the Rate Books have Thomas Rossiter owning Lots 28 and 45 until 1875, when the land was sold to William Palmer, so he obviously stayed a bit longer.    Charles married Ellen O’Shea in 1854 - she is from the family that gave the name to O’Sheas Road.  They had eight children.   Charles was an original Committee member of the Mornington Farmers Society from 1856, a  Cranbourne Shire Councillor from 1869 to 1884 and Shire President on four occasions. Charles Rossiter bred draught horses and also agitated for the first school in the Yallock/ Koo-Wee-Rup area and he  is the source of the name Rossiter Road in Koo-Wee-Rup.

The Rossiter family married into other local families - Charles and Thomas’ sister, Mercy Rossiter (1823 - 1903)  married Henry Wedge (of the family that gave Wedge Road its name) Thomas Rossiter (1831-1907)  died in Parkes in New South Wales where he was living at the time. Thomas was also involved in the Mornington Famers Society in the early years. The Society held its first show at Cranbourne in 1857and from 1860 alternated between Cranbourne and Berwick however by the late 1880s the show was held only at Berwick.

The Rossiters sold out to William Palmer in 1875 (according to the Shire of Cranbourne Rate Books) and around 1881/1882 Lots 28 and 45 were purchased by the grandly named Stratford Strettle. By 1885 he also owns Lot 29 so this brings the two parcels of land that eventually make up Tulliallan together. Strettle called the property Gladys Park.  Stratford Abraham  Strettle was an Auctioneer and it was his firm that handled the sale of Palmers land in 1882, so it looks like he purchased it for himself.

The Age July 26, 1882

There was a clearing sale at the property in December 1886 due to Stratford Strettle leaving the property and after this the property is leased to various tenants.   This may have been prompted by the death of Stratford’s brother, William, who accidentally shot himself dead at the house in July 1885. You can read an account of the inquest in the Weekly Times here.  Mr Strettle was apparently a generous host and you can read one account of his Christmas Festivities here.   There are reports of a legal case involving money owed by Strettle to a Miss Virginia Block. You can read about it here

In 1904, Mrs James Gibb purchases Gladys Park from Stratford Strettle  and by 1910 the Rate books list James Gibbs as the owner. The Hon James Gibb (1843 - 1919) and his brother Robert were the sons of Alexander Gibb of Campbellfield. James was the M.L.A for Mornington from 1880 to 1886 and also owned Melville Park (now Edrington in Berwick, the former home of Lord and Lady Casey) Gibbs was also a draught horse breeder and described as one of the most enterprising farmers in the State - a champion ploughman, gentleman an politician.   He was a Shire of Berwick Councillor for 30 years and the Federal Member for Flinders from 1903 to 1906.  His obituary in the South Bourke and Mornington Journal of March 6, 1919 said that he could claim the credit for tree planting which made Berwick one of the most charming townships in southern Victoria. 

Robert Gibb farmed for his brother, and was also involved with the Mornington Farmers Society and a local Magistrate.  He and his wife moved to Oakleigh in 1914 and he died in 1923.

The next owner of the property was Jessie Halbert. I don't know anything about this person, they held the property for under two years and a  Joseph Halbert had part of the St Germains Estate at Clyde at the same time. Are they Joseph and Jessie Halbert, the parents of Jessie Mary Vasey who was the founder of the War Widows Guild of Australia and was instrumental in getting an increase in the War Widows pension by linking it to the rate of the basic wage?  It's an interesting connection, if this was the case,  and you can read more about Jessie Vasey in the Australian Dictionary of Biography here.

In 1913, Jessie Halbert sells to Lieutenant George A. Mitchell and it  was Mitchell who named the property Tulliallan. The Rate Books list George Mitchell owning  the property form 1913 to 1919. I am fairly certain that George is the son of Captain James Mitchell and Elizabeth (nee Anderson) of Tulliallan, Williamstown and thus when he purchased his farm in 1913 he named it Tulliallan after his family home. Captain James Mitchell was a Master Mariner, joined the Port Phillip Sea Pilots, one of the founders of the Victorian Stevedoring Co. Association and one obituary says that he was on the Committee which chose the design for the Commonwealth flag. He died in 1927 and there are advertisements in the paper for the sale of his house Tulliallan at Williamstown.  As a matter of interest one of the pall bearers at his funeral was Jules Commans who owned 540 hectares on both the north and south side of Heatherton Road in what is now called Endeavour Hills.

There are various mentions in papers on Trove which connect Lieutenant George Mitchell to Captain James Mitchell. The family appear to have been well connected and there are references in the social pages of various Melbourne papers to the engagement and weddings of the children of James and Elizabeth Mitchell.

Lieutenant Mitchell enlisted at the age of 24 on July 15, 1915. He was a 2nd Lieutenant and his next of kin was his wife, Mary Ione Mitchell. He was discharged in October 1916 as he had a ‘Commission in the Imperial Army’ and he later joined the Royal Air Force.  He obviously sold the property on his return after the war, and is listed in the Electoral Roll  as a broker and living in Melbourne. In the 1950s George and Mary were living at Ardleigh in Emerald. George died in 1965.


Advertisement for the sale of Tulliallan from The Age February 15 1919

Lieutenant Mitchell sold 'his most charming country home together with 743 acres of land' to Frederick Charles Curtis. The house was described as a very nice homestead, in splendid order, of 12 rooms with large billiard room, large dining room, large reception room and four large bedrooms. Hot and cold water laid on with a splendid service and the homestead is sewered. The outbuildings consist of detached kitchen, 2 pantries, 2 maids rooms, servants quarters, mens rooms........there is  a nice drive of English trees from the main road to the homestead and it is laid out with  a very nice lawn and summer house and has one of the best  gardens to be found in any country home of its size  near Melbourne. The building is listed on the City of Casey Heritage Study and you can access the citation here.

Frederick Curtis was Cranbourne Shire Councillor from 1925 to 1928.  I don’t know much about him, his wife, whom he married in 1905, was Florence Maud Crabtree and his occupation in the Electoral Rolls  was listed as grazier. Some of the activities of the family were reported in the social columns of the Melbourne papers including, in 1927,  a ‘coming of age  for their only daughter Gwennyth and a 21st celebration of their eldest son Keith’ - the headline was ‘a jolly evening at Berwick.’ Amongst the guests were local names such Greaves, Brunt, Whiteside, Loveridge.  In 1932 it was reported in the Dandenong Journal that Mr Curtis had purchased Oakdene in Langhorne Street, Dandneong. According to the Electoral Roll, Keith stayed at Tulliallan until the property was sold in 1938.


Table Talk March 31 1927

In 1938, Faris Addison Palfreyman purchased Tulllian; he was a English Leicester and Romney Marsh sheep breeder. When the property was sold by Palfreyman in November 1946, the purchase price included the entire stock of stud sheep and Aberdeen Angus cattle valued at £8000. Palfreyman then moved to Queensland.  In May 1926, Faris Palfreyman was the best man at the wedding of Beatrice Fischer to Arthur Long - Beatrice was the granddaughter of Jules Commans, who as we found out before, was a colleague and pall bearer at the funeral of Captain James Mitchell, whose son George was a previous owner of Tulliallan. You can read all about this fashionable wedding at St Johns Church in Toorak in the Table Talk newspaper here. Is this a coincidence that Faris later became an owner of the Tulliallan property or was he already familiar with Tulliallan when he purchased the property as it appears he moved in the same social circles as the Mitchells?  Faris deid in 1983 at the age of 80.

In 1946,  James McKenzie  Elder purchased Tulliallan. I don’t have much information on him, however he married Nancy Russell Barrett in 1929 and he was the son of prominent business man, Sir James Alexander Elder and Margaret Blyth Nicoll - you can read about Sir James in the Australian Dictionary of Biography, here. The family also had their social activities reported in the social columns of the Melbourne papers - in March 1953 there was a report of a dance at Tulliallan where ‘guests sat on hay bales at open fires and danced in the sylvan setting at an outdoor party’  Susan Curtis, James’ daughter, hosted the party. Amongst the guests were some visitors from the Western District and some members of the socially prominent Chirnside family. Susan’s marriage to Geoffrey Haggard, son of the late Commander Geoffrey Haggard, R.N was the subject of a report and  a photograph in The Argus in November 1953. In December 1954 a dinner dance was held at Tulliallan for 150 people in honour of Ian Elder, Susan’s brother.


The Argus March 2 1953


James and Nancy Elder were still at Tulliallan in 1972, according to the Electoral rolls and James died in 1978 aged 76 and Nancy in 1974, aged 70. We will leave  this history of Tulliallan owners with the Elders, but as you can see it has had many interesting at at times socially prominent and well connected owners.

Wednesday, 1 June 2016

Limerick Arms Hotel and the O'Brien family, Nar Nar Goon

In 1983 Kathleen Fitzpatrick (1905 to 1990) wrote a book Solid Bluestone foundations:  memories of an Australian childhood. In it she talks about her great grandparents, Daniel and Brigid O'Brien, who lived at Nar Nar Goon. You can read more about Katlheen Fitzpatrick in the Australian Dictionary of Biography  here.

In the 1860s, Daniel and Brigid (nee Walsh) O’Brien built the Limerick Arms Hotel on the corner of Wilson Road and the Gippsland Road (now called the Princes Highway) at Nar Nar Goon. Daniel, Brigid and their daughter one year old daughter Ellen had arrived in Melbourne in September  1841 on the Forth. Also on the same ship were John and Betty Dore  and their children Edward, Thomas, Patrick , Ellen. In 1844, John Dore and Michael Hennessey took up the Mount Ararat Run at Nar Nar Goon of 1,900 acres. The partnership existed until 1855. Hennessey then moved to Dandenong and built the Bridge Hotel and later took over the Eumemmerring Hotel. In the 1860s, Dore purchased the 640 acre Mt Ararat pre-emptive right. He later purchased another 387 acres and his son Thomas 300 acres so they held a total of 1,300 acres. The property was later bisected by the railway line when it was built in 1877.


The Limerick Arms 
Photo from Solid Bluestone Foundations by Kathleen Fitzpatrick (Penguin 1986)

Back to the O'Briens  - Daniel was a builder and the plan was to work in Victoria for four years save enough money and then return home, as it was they never did return to Ireland. The family first went to Waurn Ponds near Geelong where Daniel worked as a builder. They then  decided to buy some land  - Waurn Ponds being too dry looking they decided to buy in Gippsland and brought a farm called The Swamp at Mt Ararat or Nar Nar Goon, perhaps they were influenced in this decision by the Dores. 

The O'Brien's  had more eight children - Michael James born 1843 at Saltwater; Patrick Francis 1845, Jeremiah Gerald 1846,  Johanna Mary 1848, Catherine, 1853 - these last four were born when they were at Nar Nar Goon. Bidelia Amelia 1853, Mary Ann 1856 and Daniel 1859 were born in North Melbourne*

Because the children needed an education the O'Briens moved back to town and built a house in North Melbourne so the children could go to school.  Daniel was again working as a builder but  his business partner stole the proceeds of the business and this forced the family to move back to Nar Nar Goon where they opened the Limerick Arms. This was  a success  as the Gippsland Road went as far as Sale and there was lots of traffic; it was also a Cobb and Co Coach stop.   The hotel also had  a reputation for being spotlessly clean and offering good meals. Every six months  a Priest would visit, and conduct a mass and also baptise any babies that needed  that sacrament.  The services were either held at the Limerick Arms or the Dore's House. 

A succession of tutors were employed by the O'Briens until they settled on Daniel Ahern. The O'Briens and the Dores also built a school on Mt Ararat Creek for their own children and the the neighbouring children and Daniel Ahern was the teacher. Mr Ahern later taught at Eumemmerring State School, later called Hallam State School from 1870 to 1890. you can read about this school here. Daniel was the father of James Joseph Ahern, Shire of Berwick Secretary from 1906 until 1948.

Daniel died in 1886 at the age of 82 and Brigid in 1888 at the age of  77. The Limerick Arms was delicensed in 1908 and the building has been demolished. The son of Daniel and Brigid, Michael and his wife Johanna (nee Mulcahy) opened the Nar Nar Goon Horel in 1883.


*The information about the O'Brien children comes from Early Settlers of the Casey Cardinia District by the Narre Warren & District Family History Group.

Monday, 2 May 2016

Casey Cardinia Heritage Festival 2016




The Casey Cardinia region has a rich heritage with many treasures waiting to be discovered. Visit our Heritage Festival and delve into the history of the area through the photographic displays  provided by local heritage and historical groups and find answers to your local history questions. 

Local history books will also be available for purchase.

The Australian Great War Association will be there with a Great War display and  the Narre Warren and District Family History Group can help with genealogy queries.  If the weather is fine, Lord Casey’s Bentley will be on show.

Devonshire Teas available from the Officer Owls CWA (fee applies)

Venue: Officer Public Hall, Tivendale Road, Officer.
Free entry.